Dolores Jordan, First Lady of Derby Street

SALEM — She’s the “First Lady of Derby Street,” and Derby Street is coming together to celebrate her legacy of protecting and cementing the community’s history in the Witch City.

The Salem Alliance for the Environment (SAFE) will celebrate the legacy of Dolores Jordan on Tuesday, Nov. 10 at the Hawthorne Hotel ballroom.

Jordan, 86, is a lifelong Salem resident, born and raised in the home she lives in at the corner of Derby and White streets.

When she was born, Derby was home to the city’s Polish community, Jordan said. Today, it’s a busy throughway connecting downtown Salem to Route 1A with vibrant wharves, impressive views of the ocean and a rich awareness of its maritime history.

The First Lady of Derby Street played a heavy hand in that, even if the Derby Street she knew as a child no longer exists.

Born and raised in Polish Salem

“My parents bought this house in 1912,” Jordan said, sitting out on a back porch overlooking her garden. “I was born a few years after that, and our family has lived here up to now.”

Jordan was born to Polish parents; in fact, her father owned a store that much of the city’s Polish community centered around.

It was a hard-working community, one that didn’t have access to things such as transportation to get to work, according to Jordan. Read more.

Honor Dolores Jordan, Support SAFE

Dolores 9.24.15c poster jpgOne of Salem’s most respected, enduring and passionate activists, Dolores Jordan, will be honored at a celebration and tribute to her life at the Hawthorne Hotel on Tuesday, November 10, from 5:30-7:30 pm. A lifelong resident of Derby Street, Jordan, who is turning 87 in November, will be recognized for her many decades of civic contributions.

Noted legendary Salem historian Jim McAllister will emcee the event, and many public officials and local residents are expected to attend. Hors d’oeuvres will be available along with a cash bar. Bob Kendall will be on hand to provide musical accompaniment. Excess proceeds will go to SAFE, where Jordan has served on the Board of Directors since 2005.

In addition to her work with SAFE, Jordan  has been active with Salem Sound Coastwatch; HealthLink, Friends of Salem Woods; Clean Water Action; Greenpeace; and MASS PIRG. One of her primary goals was to stop the toxic pollution that was generated by Salem’s coal burning power plant.

She was instrumental, along with her sister Alice (now deceased), in forming Concerned Citizens of Derby Street (later the Historic Derby Street Neighborhood Association), and she worked tirelessly to secure Historic District status for Derby Street in 1974. She received the Hawthorne Historic Preservation Award in 1998 and was awarded a commendation from the National Trust for Historic preservation.

Ms. Jordan was particularly active in funding “Salem Sets Sail” an educational program for youth at the National Maritime Park. Since 2011, these funds have allowed all Salem fifth grade classes the opportunity to participate in a free educational program, Salem Sets Sail. In the last five years, over 2,000 of Salem’s schoolchildren have benefitted from Ms. Jordan’s generosity.

Because of Ms. Jordan’s support, students have learned how Salem’s maritime community played a critical role in global trade and the establishment of the United States of America. Even more importantly, Salem Sets Sail transports Salem’s young people out on the water, where they take a turn at the tiller, raise sails, and navigate through Salem Sound. In a society where today’s youth face an array of challenges and are influenced by new technologies, Salem Sets Sail immerses them in the historic and natural world to which they are also a part – an experience they might not have otherwise.

Ms. Jordan’s volunteer and civic career has also included work with the Peabody Essex Museum; the Salem Beautification Committee; the Alumni Committees of Boston University and Salem High School and fundraising and volunteer work with St. John the Baptist Parish in Salem and throughout the Polish community.

Tickets are available to the general public for $25 in advance ($30 at the door) and may be purchased on-line at Or checks made payable to SAFE may be sent to SAFE, 17 Sutton Ave, Salem 01970.

For more information: or 978.744.9141.

SAFE SOLAR Kick-off: Get the low-down on rooftop solar!

Wednesday October 14
6:30-8:30 pmSAFE Solar Kick-Off-29Sep (1)
Bentley School
25 Memorial Drive

Tired of all the telemarketers and door to door canvassers trying to sell you a solar system for your home? Confused about all the options? Should you buy or lease your solar panels?

Get the answers you need at this free public forum sponsored by SAFE Solar.

Come and learn from people who have already benefited. Meet our SOLAR COACH and some of our local partners. Speakers will include Mayor Kim Driscoll, SAFE Solar Coach Jeff Cohen, Cabot Wealth Management’s Rob Lutts and Salem City Councillor Beth Gerard.

Today’s subsidies and tax credits make solar remarkably affordable for local homeowners. Attendees at this event will learn how to take advantage of the gen
erous financial incentives before they expire next year.

The SAFE Solar Coach is a professional consultant who provides FREE, informed and practical advice for people.

SAFE’s goal is to promote a greener plant and reduce the environmental costs of fossil fuels. Our Solar Coach is available to help local residents and businesses navigate the process of researching, evaluating and contracting the best possible solar option.

Be green and make some green! Don’t be sold a solar “bill of goods.” BE SMART ABOUT SOLAR!

Follow SAFE SOLAR on Facebook:

Obama Announces Carbon Regs to Address Climate Change

Skystacky Today, President Obama released his Clean Power Plan, a first-of-its-kind plan to cut carbon pollution from the nation’s power plants. The effort to limit carbon from power plants was lead by EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, who lead a similar effort in Massachusetts that forced the clean up of Massachusetts coal plants.

According to the Center for American Progress:

The Clean Power Plan is the most ambitious action yet taken in the United States to slow global warming, and is a key part of the president’s strategy in the global fight against climate change. A draft version of the plan was released last summer and the final version responds to more than 4.3 million comments from states, utilities, communities, and more. Here are a few key things to know about the finalized rule:

  • 40 percent: Carbon-dioxide pollution is the leading contributor to climate change and power plants produce the largest amount of carbon-dioxide emissions in the United States, making up about 40 percent of all carbon pollution in the country.
  • 32 percent: Under the finalized version of the Clean Power Plan, states will be required to reduce carbon pollution by 32 percent from 2005 levels—a nine percent increase from the previous target.
  • $93 billion: The projected benefits far outweigh the costs of implementing the plan. The Clean Power Plan will lead to climate and health benefits of up to $93 billion by 2030.
  • $85: The average American family will see annual savings of $85 on their energy bill in 2030, and between 2020 and 2030 consumers will save a total of $155 billion.
  • 3,600: By 2030, the reduction in power plant pollution will prevent up to 3,600 premature deaths a year.
  • 870 million: When the Clean Power Plan is fully in place in 2030, there will be 870 million tons less carbon pollution—that is the equivalent of the annual emissions of more than 166 million cars, or 70 percent of cars in the country.

Read the full Center for American Progress analysis here.

Living with Coyotes

Thursday June 25, 7:00 to 8:30
First Church, 316 Essex St. Salem

Have you seen coyotes in your yard? Walking in the woods? On the golf course? Do you have questions, concerns, or just a general interest in where these animals have come from?

Please join us for a lively presentation on living with coyotes.

Coyotes about one of the most misunderstood and remarkable animals in North America. Our guest speaker is John Maguranis, Belmont ACO, wildlife enthusiast, and a representative of Project Coyote,, will provide a wide-ranging look at:

  • natural behavior  and habits of coyotes,
  • myths and facts
  • pet and human safety,
  • hazing techniques.

There will be plenty of time for questions, and light refreshments will be served.

Sponsored by Salem SAFE, Salem Sound Coastwatch, Salem Community Gardens, the Plummer Home Farm Project, Olde Salem Greens Golf Course, Winter Island, and Marblehead Conservancy.

PARKING is available on Essex St., in the First Church’s circular driveway, and in the rear parking lot (enter lot from 114 / North Street, take the last right immediately before the lights at Essex St.).


Launchof SAFE Solar & Energy Advisors
Thursday May 14, 7:00 to 8:30
First Church, 316 Essex St. Salem

Confused about what makes the most sense for installing solar or doing some energy efficiency project on your home or business?SAFEsolar-logo-square

SAFE has created a non-profit to offer impartial, knowledgeable advice to people on the North Shore. There are a lot of companies out there looking to sell you solar panels or a new furnace or some other energy efficiency improvement.  Our mission is to help walk you through the process and make a decision that is in your best interest. Call us before you sign a contract.

To learn more, join us for our informal kick-off of SAFE Solar hosted by co-chairs Pat Gozemba and Jeff Barz-Snell and solar coach Jeff Cohen. Learn about the incentives and options for “going solar” and how SAFE Solar & Energy Advisors can help you.

Refreshments served. On street parking available.

Carbon Nation: How a Carbon Tax Could Reduce Climate Change While Keeping the Economy Bubbling

Thursday March 26, 7 – 8 PM
First Church, 316 Essex St. Salem

From business leaders to national security agencies to scientists there is broad agreement that climate change must be addressed.  But can we afford the policies that we need? Join Citizens Climate Lobby and other local organizations as we discuss a legislative proposal that could provide the sustainability we need and actually help the economy in the process. All are welcome. Refreshments will be provided. For more information, email